She who pwns people with history
This woman’s waistcoat, dating from about 1615-18, is made of linen and embroidered with polychrome silk, silver and silver-gilt threads in a pattern of flowers and foliage with coiling stems. It has a fitted bodice fastening at the front and full-length sleeves. It was purchased by Sir William Burrell from the London art dealers Frank Partridge and Sons in 1930.Such waistcoats were worn by wealthy English ladies. The embroidery was worked first by professionals and then the panels were stitched together to form the garment. The pattern of brightly coloured flowers, here with caterpillars and butterflies, set within coils of plaited braid stitch was very popular. Variations of this design appear on other embroidered women’s waistcoats and coifs of this period including one worn by Margaret Layton of Rawdon (1569-1662), the wife of a Yorkshire landowner, which is now in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. It was possibly one of her favourite garments as she is depicted wearing it in her accompanying portrait. Other jackets can be seen in several portraits by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger and William Larkin.
Source

This woman’s waistcoat, dating from about 1615-18, is made of linen and embroidered with polychrome silk, silver and silver-gilt threads in a pattern of flowers and foliage with coiling stems. It has a fitted bodice fastening at the front and full-length sleeves. It was purchased by Sir William Burrell from the London art dealers Frank Partridge and Sons in 1930.

Such waistcoats were worn by wealthy English ladies. The embroidery was worked first by professionals and then the panels were stitched together to form the garment. The pattern of brightly coloured flowers, here with caterpillars and butterflies, set within coils of plaited braid stitch was very popular. Variations of this design appear on other embroidered women’s waistcoats and coifs of this period including one worn by Margaret Layton of Rawdon (1569-1662), the wife of a Yorkshire landowner, which is now in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. It was possibly one of her favourite garments as she is depicted wearing it in her accompanying portrait. Other jackets can be seen in several portraits by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger and William Larkin.

Source

  1. studiopractice1 reblogged this from tiny-librarian
  2. citizencinemaniac reblogged this from muirin007
  3. mylittlewolfie reblogged this from tawnyscostumesandcuriosities
  4. cmackerman reblogged this from beggars-opera
  5. melmoth reblogged this from tawnyscostumesandcuriosities
  6. animalswithfancyhats reblogged this from hoop-skirts-and-corsets
  7. coeurgryffondor reblogged this from wifeofbath
  8. pocket-elf reblogged this from tawnyscostumesandcuriosities
  9. historylovinggeek reblogged this from tiny-librarian
  10. wifeofbath reblogged this from beggars-opera
  11. inuzenko reblogged this from brsis
  12. brsis reblogged this from tawnyscostumesandcuriosities
  13. st-aurafina reblogged this from beggars-opera
  14. pedra404 reblogged this from hoop-skirts-and-corsets
  15. locorococo reblogged this from locorococo
  16. liemyj reblogged this from thegirlwithgoldeyes
  17. adesignresearcher reblogged this from psychnart
  18. fleas-will-bite reblogged this from muirin007
  19. light-from-orion-above reblogged this from tawnyscostumesandcuriosities
  20. mabianas reblogged this from harpsichordgal
  21. theladyintweed reblogged this from tawnyscostumesandcuriosities
  22. taraxacumchiroptera reblogged this from tawnyscostumesandcuriosities